Journal cover Journal topic
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.535 IF 3.535
  • IF 5-year<br/> value: 4.292 IF 5-year
    4.292
  • SNIP value: 1.523 SNIP 1.523
  • IPP value: 3.478 IPP 3.478
  • SJR value: 1.859 SJR 1.859
  • h5-index value: 54 h5-index 54
HESS cover
Executive editors:
Erwin
 
Zehe
,
Alberto
 
Guadagnini
,
Alison D.
 
Reeves
 &
Hubert H.G.
 
Savenije

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS) is an international two-stage open-access journal for the publication of original research in hydrology, placed within a holistic Earth system science context. HESS encourages and supports fundamental and applied research that seeks to understand the interactions between water, earth, ecosystems, and humans. A multi-disciplinary approach is encouraged that enables a broadening of the hydrologic perspective and the advancement of hydrologic science through the integration with other cognate sciences, and the cross-fertilization across disciplinary boundaries.

News

Institutional agreement for HESS authors affiliated with the Leibniz Universität Hannover

11 Jan 2016

Copernicus Publications and the Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) in Hanover, Germany have signed an agreement on central billing of article processing charges.

Workflow of HESS reorganized

10 Dec 2015

We have summarized the upcoming changes to HESS by the end of the year.

Citable video publications for HESS authors

29 Oct 2015

In cooperation with the TIB|AV-Portal HESS authors can now add short, citable video abstracts and video supplements to their articles.

Highlight articles

We derived mathematical formulations of relations between relative wetness and gradients driving run-off and evaporation for a one-box model such that, when conductances are optimized with the maximum power principle, the model leads exactly to a point on the Budyko curve. With dry spells and dynamics in actual evaporation added, the model compared well with catchment observations without calibrating any parameter. The maximum-power principle may thus be used to derive the Budyko curve.

M. Westhoff, E. Zehe, P. Archambeau, and B. Dewals

Here I show that seasonal tracer cycles yield strongly biased estimates of mean transit times in nonstationary catchments (and, by implication, in real-world catchments). However, they can be used to reliably estimate the fraction of "young" water in streamflow, meaning water that fell as precipitation less than roughly 2–3 months ago. This young water fraction varies systematically between high and low flows and may help in characterizing controls on stream chemistry.

J. W. Kirchner

Catchment mean transit times have been widely inferred from seasonal cycles of environmental tracers in precipitation and streamflow. Here I show that these cycles yield strongly biased estimates of mean transit times in spatially heterogeneous catchments (and, by implication, in real-world catchments). However, I also show that these cycles can be used to reliably estimate the fraction of "young" water in streamflow, meaning water that fell as precipitation less than roughly 2–3 months ago.

J. W. Kirchner

- A strategy to diagnose hydrological limitations of a Land Surface Model
- Land Surface Model adaptation for hydrological applications
- Highlights challenges faced while moving towards high resolution modelling

N. Le Vine, A. Butler, N. McIntyre, and C. Jackson

To improve the design of drought monitoring networks and water resource management during episodes of drought, there is a need for a better understanding of spatial variations in the response of aquifers to major meteorological droughts. This paper is the first to describe a suite of methods to quantify such variations. Using an analysis of groundwater level data for a case study from the UK, the influence of catchment characteristics on the varied response of groundwater to droughts is explored.

J. P. Bloomfield, B. P. Marchant, S. H. Bricker, and R. B. Morgan

Publications Copernicus