Journal cover Journal topic
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
HESS cover
Executive editors:
Erwin
 
Zehe
,
Hannah
 
Cloke
,
Alberto
 
Guadagnini
 &
Alison D.
 
Reeves

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS) is an international two-stage open-access journal for the publication of original research in hydrology, placed within a holistic Earth system science context. HESS encourages and supports fundamental and applied research that seeks to understand the interactions between water, earth, ecosystems, and humans. A multi-disciplinary approach is encouraged that enables a broadening of the hydrologic perspective and the advancement of hydrologic science through the integration with other cognate sciences, and the cross-fertilization across disciplinary boundaries.

News

New institutional agreement between the TU Darmstadt and Copernicus Publications

27 Dec 2016

Authors from the Technical University Darmstadt will profit from a new institutional agreement with Copernicus Publications starting 1 January 2017. The agreement which is valid for corresponding authors enables a direct settlement of article processing charges (APCs) between the university and the publisher.

Max Planck institutional agreement now for corresponding authors

23 Dec 2016

As of 1 January 2017 the direct settlement of article processing charges (APCs) between the Max Planck Digital Library and Copernicus Publications will be valid for corresponding authors.

Geographical distribution of views now available in journal ALMs

08 Sep 2016

Copernicus Publications has extended the article level metrics (ALMs) by showing the geographical distribution of views. This information is available for articles published after 3 August 2016.

Highlight articles

In this study a comprehensive model was developed that combines numerical schemes with high-order accuracy for solution of the advection–dispersion equation considering transient storage zones term in rivers. In developing the subjected model (TOASTS) to achieve better accuracy and applicability, irregular cross sections and unsteady flow regimes were considered. For this purpose the QUICK scheme, due to its high stability and low approximation error, has been used for spatial discretization.

Maryam Barati Moghaddam, Mehdi Mazaheri, and Jamal MohammadVali Samani

The remaining populations of the endangered dwarf wedgemussel (DWM) (Alasmidonta heterodon) in the upper Delaware River, northeastern USA, were thought to be located in areas of substantial groundwater discharge to the river. Physical, thermal, and geophysical methods applied at several spatial scales indicate that DWM are located within or directly downstream of areas of substantial groundwater discharge to the river. DWM may depend on groundwater discharge for their survival.

Donald O. Rosenberry, Martin A. Briggs, Emily B. Voytek, and John W. Lane

While the assessment of "vertical" (magnitude) errors of streamflow simulations is standard practice, "horizontal" (timing) errors are rarely considered. To assess their role, we propose a method to quantify both errors simultaneously which closely resembles visual hydrograph comparison. Our results reveal differences in time-magnitude error statistics for different flow conditions. The proposed method thus offers novel perspectives for model diagnostics and evaluation.

S. P. Seibert, U. Ehret, and E. Zehe

This theoretical paper describes the energy fluxes and dissipation along the flow paths involved in root water uptake, an approach that is rarely taken. We show that this provides useful additional insights for understanding the biotic and abiotic impediments to root water uptake. This approach shall be applied to explore efficient water uptake strategies and help locate the limiting processes in the complex soil-plant-atmosphere system.

A. Hildebrandt, A. Kleidon, and M. Bechmann

Geomorphometry, the science of quantitative terrain characterization, has traditionally focused on the investigation of terrestrial landscapes. More recently, a suite of geomorphometric techniques have been applied to characterize the seafloor. The dynamic, four-dimensional nature of the marine environment and differences in data collection methods cause issues for geomorphometry that are specific to marine applications. This article offers the first review of marine geomorphometry to date.

V. Lecours, M. F. J. Dolan, A. Micallef, and V. L. Lucieer

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