Journal cover Journal topic
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
HESS cover
Executive editors:
Erwin
 
Zehe
,
Theresa
 
Blume
,
Hannah
 
Cloke
 &
Alberto
 
Guadagnini
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS) is an international two-stage open-access journal for the publication of original research in hydrology. HESS encourages and supports fundamental and applied research that advances the understanding of hydrological systems, their role in providing water for ecosystems and society, and the role of the water cycle in the functioning of the Earth system. A multi-disciplinary approach is encouraged that broadens the hydrological perspective and the advancement of hydrological science through integration with other cognate sciences and cross-fertilization across disciplinary boundaries.
News
HESS article most cited source on Wikipedia 09 May 2018

A paper published in Hydrology and Earth System Sciences back in 2007 on global climate zones has been named the most cited source on Wikipedia, referenced more than 2.8 million times!

Extended agreement with the Leibniz Association 03 May 2018

As of 1 May 2018 the centralized payment of article processing charges (APCs) with the Leibniz Association has been extended to 53 Leibniz Institutions participating in the Leibniz Association's Open Access Publishing Fund.

New article processing charges for HESS 05 Dec 2017

From 1 January 2018 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS) will slightly increase the article processing charges.

Highlight articles

Evaporation causes the isotopic composition of soil water to become different from that of the original precipitation source. If multiple samples originating from the same source are available, they can be used to reconstruct the original source composition. However, soil water is influenced by seasonal variability in both precipitation sources and evaporation patterns. We show that this variability, if not accounted for, can lead to biased estimates of the precipitation source water.

Paolo Benettin, Till H. M. Volkmann, Jana von Freyberg, Jay Frentress, Daniele Penna, Todd E. Dawson, and James W. Kirchner

Flooding is a significant hazard and extreme events in recent years have focused attention on effective means of reducing its risk. An approach known as natural flood management (NFM) seeks to increase flood resilience by a range of measures that work with natural processes. The paper develops a modelling approach to assess one type NFM of intervention – distributed additional hillslope storage features – and demonstrates that more strategic placement is required than has hitherto been applied.

Peter Metcalfe, Keith Beven, Barry Hankin, and Rob Lamb

We report the first ever regional-scale implementation of the Surface Temperature Initiated Closure (STIC1.2) model for mapping evapotranspiration (ET) using MODIS land surface and gridded climate datasets to overcome the existing uncertainties in aerodynamic temperature and conductance estimation in global ET models. Validation and intercomparison with SEBS and MOD16 products across an aridity gradient in the US manifested better ET mapping potential of STIC1.2 in different climates and biomes.

Nishan Bhattarai, Kaniska Mallick, Nathaniel A. Brunsell, Ge Sun, and Meha Jain

This study used a portable 56-sensor, 3-D temperature array with three heat pulse sources to measure the flow direction and magnitude below the water–sediment interface. Breakthrough curves from each of the sensors were analyzed using a heat transport equation. The use of short-duration heat pulses provided a rapid, accurate assessment technique for determining dynamic and multi-directional flow patterns in the hyporheic zone and is a basis for improved understanding of biogeochemical processes.

Eddie W. Banks, Margaret A. Shanafield, Saskia Noorduijn, James McCallum, Jörg Lewandowski, and Okke Batelaan

Streams are important sources of carbon (C) to the atmosphere, but it is unclear whether they only outgas C from terrestrial sources or mineralize terrestrial dissolved organic matter (DOM). Our unique synoptic study showed that DOM quantity and quality differed between the stream and riparian groundwater, and that DOM export decreased by up to half along a 4km reach. Thus, stream DOM is not a reflection of terrestrial DOM, and headwater streams could be key for assessing global C fluxes.

Susana Bernal, Anna Lupon, Núria Catalán, Sara Castelar, and Eugènia Martí

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