Journal cover Journal topic
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.642 IF 3.642
  • IF 5-year<br/> value: 3.916 IF 5-year
    3.916
  • SNIP value: 1.443 SNIP 1.443
  • IPP value: 3.250 IPP 3.250
  • SJR value: 1.852 SJR 1.852
  • h5-index value: 49 h5-index 49
HESS cover
Executive editors:
Erwin
 
Zehe
,
Alberto
 
Guadagnini
,
Alison D.
 
Reeves
 &
Hubert H.G.
 
Savenije

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS) is an international two-stage open-access journal for the publication of original research in hydrology, placed within a holistic Earth system science context. HESS encourages and supports fundamental and applied research that seeks to understand the interactions between water, earth, ecosystems, and humans. A multi-disciplinary approach is encouraged that enables a broadening of the hydrologic perspective and the advancement of hydrologic science through the integration with other cognate sciences, and the cross-fertilization across disciplinary boundaries.

News

Website relaunch

18 Mar 2015

The HESS website has been given a new look, and the navigation has been adjusted.
Further details:

TU Delft and Copernicus Publications cooperate in supporting open access

22 Jan 2015

In order to further promote open access, the TU Delft Library has transferred a budget to Copernicus to be used by its scientists in 2015.

New manuscript types for HESS

13 Jan 2015

There are three additional manuscript types now: black swans & scientific falsifications, cutting-edge case studies, and education & communication.

Recent articles


Highlight articles

In this study, we analyze a set of high-resolution, surface-based, 2-D ground-penetrating radar (GPR) observations of artificially induced subsurface water dynamics. In particular, we place close scrutiny on the evolution of the capillary fringe in a highly dynamic regime with surface-based time-lapse GPR. We thoroughly explain all observed phenomena based on theoretical soil physical considerations and numerical simulations of both subsurface water flow and the expected GPR response.

P. Klenk, S. Jaumann, and K. Roth

We present a systematic comparison of changes in historical extreme precipitation in station observations (HadEX2) and 15 climate models from the CMIP5 (as the largest and most recent sets of available observational and modeled data sets), on global and continental scales for 1901-2010, using both parametric (linear regression) and non-parametric (the Mann-Kendall as well as Sen’s slope estimator) methods, taking care to sample observations and models spatially and temporally in comparable ways.

B. Asadieh and N. Y. Krakauer

In this paper we present a high-resolution global-scale groundwater model of an upper aquifer. An equilibrium water table at its natural state is constructed. Aquifer parameterization is based on available global datasets on lithology and conductivity combined with estimated aquifer thickness. The results showed groundwater levels are well simulated for many regions of the world. Simulated flow paths showed the relevance of including lateral groundwater flows in global scale hydrological models.

I. E. M. de Graaf, E. H. Sutanudjaja, L. P. H. van Beek, and M. F. P. Bierkens

ERA-Interim/Land is a global land surface reanalysis covering the period 1979–2010. It describes the evolution of soil moisture, soil temperature and snowpack. ERA-Interim/Land includes a number of parameterization improvements in the land surface scheme with respect to the original ERA-Interim and a precipitation bias correction based on GPCP. A selection of verification results show the added value in representing the terrestrial water cycle and its main land surface storages and fluxes.

G. Balsamo, C. Albergel, A. Beljaars, S. Boussetta, E. Brun, H. Cloke, D. Dee1, E. Dutra, J. Muñoz-Sabater, F. Pappenberger, P. de Rosnay, T. Stockdale, and F. Vitart

The focus of this paper is to (1) present a community data set of daily forcing and hydrologic response data for 671 unimpaired basins across the contiguous United States that spans a very wide range of hydroclimatic conditions, and (2) provide a calibrated model performance benchmark using a common conceptual snow and hydrologic modeling system. This benchmark provides a reference level of model performance across a very large basin sample and highlights regional variations in performance.

A. J. Newman, M. P. Clark, K. Sampson, A. Wood, L. E. Hay, A. Bock, R. J. Viger, D. Blodgett, L. Brekke, J. R. Arnold, T. Hopson, and Q. Duan

Publications Copernicus